What is Li-Fi Technology ? Can it replace Wi-Fi?



Li-Fi (light fidelity) is a bidirectional wireless device that uses LED or infrared light to transmit data. Unlike Wi-Fi, which uses radiofrequency to transmit an internet signal, Li-Fi technology only requires a light source with a chip to transmit an internet signal by light waves.


Li-Fi was invented by Harald Haas from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland back in 2011 when he demonstrated for the first time that by flickering the light from a single LED, he could transmit far more data than a cellular tower.


Li-Fi, the next generation of wireless that is ready for seamless integration into the 5G network, is supported by a global variety of organizations.


Li-Fi is a light communication device that can send data at high speeds through the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared spectrums. Nowadays only LED lamps can be used for visible light transmission. 


Li-Fi is much simpler and uses direct modulation methods similar to those used in low-cost infrared communications systems such as remote control units, while radio frequency communication involves radio circuits, antennas, and complex receivers. Since LED light bulbs have such high intensities, they can handle incredibly high data rates.

In mobile devices, Li-Fi can deliver multiple Gigabits per second speeds. This next-generation technology would move wireless technology to new heights, providing us with immense bandwidth.



Li-Fi offers increased reliability, allowing more interference-free communications and 1000 times the data density, resulting in a vastly improved user experience.

Li-Fi currently has a three times lower latency than Wi-Fi and it will revolutionize innovation, automation, and apps like AR and VR.

In a physical space, light can be stored and secured as it can not pass through any walls. Li-Fi allows for more control since it provides detailed localization.

Source- PureLiFi

Since Li-Fi is fully networked and each Li-Fi enabled light has a unique IP address, advanced geofencing can be easily implemented in a Li-Fi network.

Interference from a wide variety of devices, including cordless phones, microwaves, and neighboring Wi-Fi networks, makes RF vulnerable. Since Li-Fi signals can be specified by the area of illumination, interference can be avoided and even removed. This also implies that Li-Fi can be used in RF-sensitive environments such as hospitals, power plants, and airplanes.



There are also other ways for using invisible portions of the light spectrum, such as infrared, which is now being used to transmit data back to the lightbulb.

Since light bounces off surfaces, Li-Fi is not merely a line-of-sight technology.




Trial of Li-fi technology

Li-Fi is a wireless communication system, and the data rate is calculated by the device's signal strength rather than its line of sight. The ratio of the desired data to any intervening data and noise can be used to determine signal quality.

Trials demonstrating the strength and speed of Li-Fi technology have been carried out successfully in Scotland's Orkney Islands. The trials were part of 5G RuralFirst, a co-innovation initiative led by tech behemoth Cisco and partly sponsored by the UK Government's Department for Digital, Entertainment, Media, and Sport (DCMS).




Li-fi in aircrafts

Li-fi is soon to make its way in the aircraft, it will have a greater effect because it offers a better onboard communication experience in terms of bandwidth, latency, and stability. Its main benefit is that visible light does not interfere with an airline's sensitive equipment, making flights safer. Its links are also unaffected by aircraft movements.



Source: FastTrack

Installation of Li-Fi systems on aircraft would also be advantageous because it eliminates cabling. Infrastructure changes to accommodate Li-Fi onboard the aircraft to low-weight fiber optic solutions will help reduce the plane's weight and fuel consumption.


As Li-Fi is installed in airline cabins, it will have a greater effect because it offers a better onboard communication experience in terms of bandwidth, latency, and stability. Its main benefit is that visible light does not interfere with an airline's sensitive equipment, making flights safer. Its links are also unaffected by aircraft movements.


Installation of Li-Fi systems on aircraft would also be advantageous because it eliminates cabling. Infrastructure changes to accommodate Li-Fi onboard the aircraft to low-weight fiber optic solutions will help reduce the plane's weight and fuel consumption.




Li-Fi around the world

Indonesia is one of the first countries to test Li-Fi in an educational facility. Signify (Euronext: LIGHT), the world leader in lighting, announced today that it is piloting its commercial Li-Fi system with more than 30 customers in Europe, North America, and Asia.


Smart village in India

India has also started their journey with Li-fi recently, with two villages in Gujrat, Akrund, and Navangar. The two villages were recently connected with li-fi connectivity by an Ahmedabad-based startup, making them India's first smart village. Now, these two villages will get faster, safer internet through electricity lines.




Why Li-Fi will not replace Wi-Fi any time sooner


It is important to understand that Li-Fi is not actually a modern technology. The same wireless IR transmission technology is used by your television remote. Li-Fi stands for visible light communication (VLC), which can transfer data at speeds of up to 224 gigabits per second by using light. This is generally referred to as the upload and download rates. Although Li-Fi will allow you to transmit large amounts of data much faster, there will be no improvement in latency, or what we commonly refer to as "lag."


Li-Fi can transfer data at speeds of up to 224 gigabits per second by using light. This means that a Li-Fi would not boost the efficiency of internet media such as video conferencing, video games, or internet-based phone calls (VoIP).


There is no Li-Fi if all power to light is switched off. However, Li-Fi technology can be programmed to dim to the point that a room appears dark while still transmitting data. Between 10% and 90% illumination, there is consistent efficiency.


Though Li-fi can be used for secured areas and to prevent electromagnetic interference, it is not going to replace Wi-fi any time soon.




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To help their work, Newsmusk allows writers to use primary sources. White papers, government data, initial reporting, and interviews with industry experts are only a few examples. Where relevant, we also cite original research from other respected publishers.

Source: PureLiFi, Times of India, Wikipedia


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